Mod Shop – Nerf Longshot – OzNerfNerd Kit Install

What seems like an incredibly long time ago I grabbed an assortment of kit off a Queensland based blaster enthusiast who goes by the name of OzNerfNerd. I was thinking about this recently and I’m pretty sure that the reason it seems like it was such a long time ago s because it was! I got my hands on some of his Longshot and Reverse Plunger kits over 6 months ago, yet never got around to actually doing anything with the Longshot kits. About 2 months ago I bought another Longshot with the specific purpose of putting this kit into it, but just never got around to it. No matter! No Time like the present! Another cliche! Etc!…

The blaster in question had already had the air restrictors removed before I started on it so we will only be specifically covering the ONN kit install today.

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Tools/Materials needed…

Phillips head screw driver
Claw hammer
ONN Longshot kit
Sandpaper/flat faced file
Very strong adhesive (I used 3 day Araldite
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We’ll start with the blaster in question.

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Start by removing the stock. You should always put the screws in a small container of some sort but you should definitely do it for this mod as we won’t be finishing it on one day!

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Then pry the priming handle apart with a claw hammer.

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Then you can remove the rest of the screws in the shell. All the screws excluding the two at the very front are the same so that makes things easier for us.

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As always, take a moment or two to familiarise yourself with the workings of the blaster. It will make reassembly significantly easier.

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Got it? Good. Next up we’ll remove the jam door.

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Like so.

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Then the catch.

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Be careful not to lose the spring.

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Then the priming indicator.

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Like so.

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Now we can pull the whole breech and plunger assembly out.

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All nicely in one go.

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Now to work on said breech.

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Start by separating the main pieces. To do this we’ll need to push this pin through.

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I normally use a really small screwdriver, but anything you’ve got that’s small enough to fit in the hole left behind will do.

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Once the pin is out the breech will simply pop out of the bolt sled.

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We’ll work on the bolt sled part first. In highly sprung Longshots this is often the first part to break.

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To that end we’ll be reinforcing it with these brackets.

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From the factory the bolt sled has these little ridges on the inside. They are not conducive to good adhesion to the reinforcements so they’ll have to go.

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Simply sand them away.

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Layer your chosen adhesive on, press the brackets hard up against the inside of the bolt sled then wait to dry.

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Which takes us to the plunger.

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Remove the two screws holding the end cap on.

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To free the plunger itself.

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There’s then another screw on the plunger head, remove that.

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Which should free the spring. Stock? (I got this second hand so can’t be completely sure, but I think it’s stock) spring on the left, ONN on the right.

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Next up is the o-ring.

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Pry it off with a small screwdriver.

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Stock on the left, ONN on the right.

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Then put the plunger head back on the rod, complete with the upgraded spring.

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Finally we’ll need to pad the plunger. Clean it thoroughly so that we’ve got a good surface to stick it to, make sure it’s centred and that’s about all we need.

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Place the plunger back into the plunger tube and screw the back plate in too.

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Now we unfortunately get to play the waiting game. You could continue but you really want to make sure the glue on the bolt sled is dry because we don’t want those brackets to move. So we’ll call it a night (or three) at this point and come back later.

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OK, and we’re back. Reassemble the breech and plunger assembly.

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Slot it back in the shell.

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Grab the priming indicator.

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Pop it back in the shell.

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Then the catch.

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Then the jam door.

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Then the shell, priming handle and stock. Again all the screws are the same except for the two at the very front of the blaster, they’re the extra long ones.

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Mod Shop – Nerf Maverick – AR Removal

Ahh the good old Nerf Maverick. Often touted as the introductory blaster into the world of foam darts, I’m the first to admit that I’m not it’s biggest fan. I try to encourage everyone I can to start off with something more practical like a Raider or even a NiteFinder. It’s “rotate and fire” on trigger pull is close on the worst thing ever. Miss-fires are more common than they should be, a lot of which can admittedly be removed by user error, it’s still just an objectively bad design. However, none of this stops us from trying to improve it. To that end we’ll be working through a simple AR removal this week.

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Tools/Material Required

Phillips head screwdriver
Claw hammer

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Ooo look, a Maverick.

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The screws are on the right hand side of the shell for a change.

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Start by removing the priming handle.

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Then remove the rest of the screws.

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There’s one hiding under where the priming bar sat.

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Then we can open the shell.

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As always, take a moment to familiarise yourself with the internals.

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Cool, lets get back to it. Now we’ll need to remove the barrels.

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To do that, we need to pull the rotational mechanism back a little.

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Like so.

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Ok, on to the barrel. We need to pry it apart to get to the AR. Insert your claw hammer under the front of the rotational arm then pry.

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We should end up with the following components. When they go back together it will need to be in this order.

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Looking from the back you should find three screws. Remove those and pull the barrel assembly apart.

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We should find these.

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Remove the lot.

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Oooo, no restrictions.

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Screw the barrel back together.

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Then insert the bar again. The pieces go in this order.

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Which should give us a complete barrel assembly again.

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Pop it back into the shell. You’ll have to push the little rotational mechanism back a little to get it to seat correctly, just as we did when removing it.

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Close the shell up.

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Replace the priming handle, making sure to thread the bar through the spring.

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And we’re done. One AR’d Nerf Maverick.

Game – Nerf Wars @ The Canberra Indoor Rock Climbing Centre

OK, so I know I’ve been a little light on the mod posts recently and we’re about to get another ‘non-mod post’ but I can’t just sit on this one. A few months back I got back into indoor rock climbing. I used to climb when I was rather little, then worked at the Canberra Indoor Rock Climbing centre (CIRC) back in college, but really hadn’t done much since then. Then a few months back my partner and I decided to go looking for another sporting type activity to do after work a couple of nights a week. I roped in some friends (ha!) and we started climbing fairly regularly. Shortly after that I got the idea that the climbing gym would make a pretty good indoor nerf venue; it’s mostly a big open space plus a rather nice mezzanine level overlooking the main floor. I dropped in on the owner one evening, told him about my idea and before we knew it we had penciled in a date and I went home to organise the event.

Before we go much further I have to give a big thank you to the Canberra Indoor Rock Climbing Centre for letting us borrow their gym of the evening. It’s pretty rare to find an indoor venue to nerf in and they were very supportive. If you ever find yourself in Canberra I can highly recommend it. Indoor climbing is loads of fun and CIRC is a great venue.

Enough back story though, on to the games!

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We had an awesome turn out with over 40 people in attendance.

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All the gear was left up on the mezzanine level with the main playing to be done down stairs.

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I made up a few collapsible barriers specifically for the night. A how to on these should appear in the next few weeks.

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The first few games we ran were simple 6v6 single elimination games.

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The mats in the bouldering areas made for super comfortable viewing areas.

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Teams constantly rotated throughout the night so that everyone got a chance to be on a different team each time.

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In addition to the collapsible barriers I also strung up a few tarps as cover.

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The indoor venue and abundance of cover made for a very different game than what most of us were used to.

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It also made finding darts significantly easier than on the grass that we normally play on.

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After the straight up 6v6 games we switched to a ‘constantly respanwing 6 on the field at any one time capture the flag’ game.

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This game worked by having everyone split into two teams, then playing a single elimination capture the flag. The catch was that each team was only ever able to have 6 players on the field at any one time. When you were out, you simply ran back to your team’s starting point and tagged the next player in line. They would then join the game and you would join the end of the line and start reloading.

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In such a small venue this made for a really intense game.

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We ran a few rounds of that before switching it up again.

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The next game was a timed bunker rush. The attackers had unlimited respawns while the defenders had none. Each team took turns attacking with the winners being the team that could wipe out the other team the fastest.

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This was a little too broken and both games were over incredibly quickly (each game lasting less than a minute) but they were fun.

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As always, there were some rather interesting blasters in attendance.

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But that’s not to say those with stock blasters were ever really outgunned.

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It’s not very often that you can catch two darts in flight at once but you’re sure not going to complain when it happens.

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We ran a couple of Vortex only rounds where ricochets counted.

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Then turned off all the lights and did some ‘Firefly Tech’ only rounds.

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Finally, to round out the evening we finished up with another ‘constant respawn 6 on the field at any time’ game.

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I’ll just round out the post however with an assortment of photos from the evening as a whole.

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Again, have to give a huge thanks to Canberra Indoor Rock Climbing for the venue and general support, the Canberra and Southern NSW Dart Tag group for the photos and the event, Andrew/Arthwollipot for his photos, and the players for turning up and making an amazing night out of it. Couldn’t have done it without all of you.

How to Solder – A must have skill for electrical blaster modding

Another requested post today and a perfect opportunity to raise something I’ve been meaning to for a while. If you want to see anything in particular on this blog, let me know and I’ll do my best to oblige.

Ok, lets get to it. Soldering is something that is very much overlooked in the world of blaster modding; with many people instead relying on the much dodgier ‘twist and tape’ method or just ignoring electrical modding altogether. Now twist and tape might very well work for quite some time, but it’s nothing compared to soldering. I started writing a ‘what is solder’ explanation here, but then realised that Wikipedia both already said it, and probably said it better…

Solder is a fusable metal alloy used to join together metal workpieces and having a melting point below that of the workpiece(s). Soft solder is what is most often thought of when solder or soldering is mentioned and it typically has a melting range of 90 to 450 °C.”

Soldering is a process in which two or more metal items are joined together by melting and flowing a filler metal (solder) into the joint, the filler metal having a lower melting point than the workpiece. Soldering differs from welding in that soldering does not involve melting the work pieces.”

Awesome.Today we’ll run through joining two wires together, but the basic principles can be used on practically anything involving a wire and something else to connect it to.

We’ll start off with the tools and material as always; in this case some solder and a soldering iron.

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And some wire which we’ll be joining.

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Strip back a little of the plastic coating to reveal the exposed wire. Wire strippers are ideal for this, but with a little practice, a set of pliers with a cutting tool will be sufficient.

Once the wires are exposed, twist the individual strands together to form one core.

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Do the same to the other wire we want to join.

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Bend the ends to form little hooks.

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Hook the two ends together.

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Then twist the wires back around themselves. This ensures that even without the solder, you’ve still got a relatively solid join right here.

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Start by heating the wire itself, then apply some solder to the wire. This will ensure that the solder is distributed between the individual strands of wire throughout the entire joint.

A common mistake is to apply the solder to the iron and let it melt over the wire. This isn’t what we’re after as you’ll just end up with a blob of solder on top of the joint, with nothing in the middle. This obviously won’t be as strong.

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Once you’re done, cover with tape.

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And we’re done.