DIY – AA and D Sized Dummy Batteries

I’ve had a few people ask me recently about dummy batteries and this got me thinking. I’ve been told since forever that you shouldn’t mix different type of batteries (say lithium 14500’s with your standard alkaline batteries), but I’d never bothered actually sourcing out dummy batteries to take their place. However, I’ve been doing a few commissions on electronic blasters over the past few weeks and while I don’t mind doing the dodgy on mine, I want the work I do for others to be top notch. I therefore went looking for some dummy batteries.

Unfortunately, I couldn’t find any a price even close to reasonable. So what’s the simple solution? Make my own of course! Today we’ll be making both some AA and D sized dummy batteries.

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Tools/Materials needed…

Solder and Iron
Drill and an assortment of bits
AA-D convertor/AAA-AA convertor
Small length of wire
Wire strippers
12.7/9.5mm dowell
Something flat and metal (I used the blade of a knife but just about anything would work here)
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The materials in question

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Mark the dowel at the length of a battery.

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Then cut.

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Drill a small hole through the centre of the dowel, then counter sink a small recess in each end.

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Feed some wire through the dowel and cut it to length. We want a little over on each end.

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Strip the end of the wire back.

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Place a large blob of solder in the small counter suck recess we made earlier, making sure it has a good connection with the stripped end of wire.

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While the solder is still hot, flatten it out with your flat metal object.

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Insert the dowel into the adaptor case and we’re done! You now have your very own AA dummy battery and D dummy battery.

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HvZ@ANU Part Two – Another YouTube Special

So a few weeks back I made a post about some reminiscing about HvZ@ANU after catching up with some of the founders. I didn’t mention this at the time but that then lead to finally organising a HvZ@ANU Reunion event. Fast forward to the weekend before last and the day was upon us; an afternoon of HvZ followed by a party that evening.

The games saw the return of Eleanor, the Nerf Flamethrower.

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The party had more pizzas than we knew what to do with.

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And look at that receipt.

 

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Myles (the founding club president) explained why everything ever happened anywhere.

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I exist in multiple forms at once; some with bigger hair than others but both with stupid faces.

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And Chris (our second president) looks impressed.

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The Riverina Dart Tag Facebook page has awesome coverage of the games we played that day, but I’m mostly here to share the slideshows I made for the party. These give a good overview of the evolution of the club and bring up a bunch of happy memories.

Foundation – Where it all came from

Game One – A massive learning experience for all. I’m the guy in the cape, look at all that sexy, sexy hair (said hair hasn’t been that long for quite some time).

Game Two – My first go at moderating. Again, I’m the guy in the cape, although this time it’s white as I was an NPC. Check the brilliance of my mate Chris with his dual Storm Tommy’s.

Game Three – If you’re not noticing the trend yet, I’m the guy in the cape again, although this time with added morph suit.

Mod Shop – Nerf Retaliator – AR Removal, Spring Upgrade and Dead Space Removal

Ok; continuing on from where we left off last week, albeit with a similar but different blaster. Nerf’s Retaliator is the elite version of the old N-Strike Recon. I was always relatively partial to the Recon, it was my first Nerf branded blaster, so I was interested to see what could be done to the Retaliator. This week we’ll be briefly covering the AR removal process that we did last week on the Rampage, the process is essentially the same between the two blasters, and adding an additional spring.

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Tools/Materials required…

Phillips head screwdriver
Drill and assortment of drill bits
Long round hand file
Dremel + grinding tool
Stock NiteFinder spring
Small knife
Hot glue gun + glue

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As always, the blaster itself.

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Remove the two screws at the back and the end cap.

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Then the rest of the screws in the shell. They’re all the same size except one.

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This screw at the front of the blaster is significantly longer than the rest. Remember this when it comes to reassembly.

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You might not notice at first but there are also two screws hiding under the cocking mechanism. Pull it back to reveal them.

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Once they’re all out you’ll be able to separate the shell. As always, take a few moments to familiarise yourself with the internals.

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Comfortable? Good. Time to continue the disassembly process.

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We’ll start by removing the spring.

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Then the catch.

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Then the plunger assembly.

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Pull the breech back a little.

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Like so.

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Then lift it out.

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Here you can see the new dart stopper. It’s much better than the old one in the Recon.

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Ok, back to the breech.

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I forgot to take a photo from this angle so here’s the breech from the Rampage. Apart from the priming bar extending forward it’s essentially the same thing. Using a small screwdriver, push this rod all the way out.

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Allowing us to separate your breech from the bolt sled.

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Grab your drill and go to town on the AR.

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Then clean it up with a hand file

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Place the breech back in the bolt sled and replace the bar.

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Ok, AR removal done; time to start work on the spring addition and to move to the back of the blaster.

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When we first put the NIteFinder spring in, you’ll notice that it’s too big. This means we can’t close the blaster and that it obviously won’t work.

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So lets fix that! Grab your Dremel and remove just enough of the shell so that the spring fits. Take this process very slowly, checking at every step of the way. If you remove too much, the spring won’t seat correctly and it all might not work.

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It should be able to close cleanly with the larger spring in place.

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Once you’re satisfied with the shell mods, clean up the burred/melted plastic with a knife.

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Now remove the plunger from the tube. Some people have said that you have to heat up the plunger tube to get the back orange ring off in order to do this. Nuts to that, just pull it out at an angle and it will come out just fine. Nothing fancy required.

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Here we can see the inside of the plunger head. The dead space in between the X is what we’re going to fill.

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With hot glue. Don’t fill over the X as it will then interfere with the priming of the blaster.

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Enough of the mods, time for reassembly! Place the bolt sled back in the shell, taking notice of lining up the priming handle too.Photobucket

Put the plunger back in the tube.

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Then the tube back in the blaster.

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Then the catch. The cutout should face forward, spring side down.

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Then replace the spring. Start with the stock spring, then slide the stock NiteFinder spring over the top of it.

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You’ll notice that the spring is slightly too long. That’s ok, it’s easier to continue with it hanging out a little. We can push it back in once the blaster is half together.

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Replace the other half of the shell, put a few screws in the front, then push the springs in the back. You should then be able to hold it together while you replace the rest of the screws.

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Reattach the end cap and we’re done.

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It’s stupidly windy outside at the moment so I can’t give you a definitive range increase over just the AR removal but from basic testing, it’s freaking impressive. I used it in a game this past weekend, range would be close to my BT modded Stampede.