Mod Shop – Lanard Triple Shot – Spring upgrade, deadspace reduction, couplered, shell reinforcement.

I’m the first to admit that I was never a fan of the Triple Shot when it was first released. It was underpowered, uncomfortable and went through darts like no tomorrow. A friend was in love with them though; he viewed it as a proper pump-action blaster, everything your zombie hunter needed. It’s aesthetics and priming style were never enough for me however. The real joy instead came when I finally decided to have a go at modding one. Because it fires three darts with each shot, I figured it would go far better if it was to only fire one. Did a quick search around the internet (as you should always do) as I assumed someone would have done something similar. It was as this point that I discovered the brilliance of an Octoshot. It took a few weeks working on it on and off before it was done, but I was pretty happy with my Octoshot. The best part however was discovering just how simple the Triple Shot is. In terms of modification potential, it’s certainly one of my favourite springers.

The reason being that it’s just so simple, cheap and relatively easy to get rather impressive ranges out of it. A few weeks back Myer had a sale where clear Triple Shots could be picked up for only $13. With that at the front of my mind, I grabbed a couple…

OK, lets get to it then. Today’s walkthrough will take us through a spring upgrade, a reduction of deadspace within the plunger tube, and adding a PCV coupler. We’ll also have to reinforce the catch and the shell itself to cope with the additional force provided by the more powerful springs.

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Tools/materials needed

Screwdrivers
Hot glue
Epoxy adhesive
Modeling putty
Upgraded main spring
15mm PVC coupler
Dremel with grinding and cutting tools
Foam padding
Small hand file

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We’ll kick off with the blaster itself.

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We’ll start by removing the priming handle.

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Exposing this screw underneath. This is the only screw on the outside of the blaster that is different to all of the other ones. Remember this.

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Then you can remove the rest of the screws on the outside and pull the shell apart

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As always, have a good look around the inside and try to get an understanding of how it all works. Here you can see the priming bar below, which pulls the plunger rod backwards, with the catch at the top.

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The front of the blaster is mostly concerned with the rotational mechanism that we’ll actually be removing altogether.

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Here shows how the priming bar moves the rotating bar.

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The trigger at the back.

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The stock.

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Ok, enough of that, let’s get back on with the dis-assembly. We’ll need to remove the stock.

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Then the barrel.

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It just lifts straight up.

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Then remove the rotating bar.

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Like so.

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Then remove the plunger.

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Then the priming bar.

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Then the catch.

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Ok, now to get to work on the plunger.

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The end cap isn’t held on with anything and should just come off.

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Allowing you to pull the plunger rod out.

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Being a direct plunger blaster, spring replacements are incredibly simple compared to reverse plungers. Practically any spring fits! In this case I used an aftermarket reverse plunger spring I had lying around in addition to the stock spring.

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Push them together.

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Now to work on the plunger head.

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Pry off the front cup.

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Then put it back on backwards. This removes some of the dead space inside the plunger tube.

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Then go to town on hot glue, filling the space between the two cups.

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Like so.

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Now move on to the plunger tube.

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Remove the front turret seal.

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Cut the front of the plunger tube off.

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Then go to town with the grinding wheel and your Dremel.

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You want your 15mm coupler to be able to fit.

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Like so.

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Now glue the coupler into place with some fairly hardcore adhesive. I used Tarzans Grip.

Note that you don’t actually want it this far inside as it appears in this picture. You only want it to extend maybe 5mm in the tube.

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Cut a piece of foam padding to be the same size as the inner diameter as the plunger tube.

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Then cut a hole in the middle with the same outer diameter as the coupler.

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Put it inside the plunger tube.

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Then push it right down to the end of the tube. The foam padding should eat up the deadspace between the coupler and the wall of the plunger tube.

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Now test fit the tube back in the shell and figure out how much we’ll have to remove.

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Grind away until it fits.

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Then do the same to the other side.

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Test fit again.

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Then we’ll move on to the catch. From the factory the catch has this stupid sprung section, allowing the possibility for misfires. We’re going to remove that chance.

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Start by removing this spring.

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Like so.

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Force the movable nub down and fill the space with hot glue.

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Like so. We want it so that the nub on the bottom there can’t retract back in to the catch.

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Then flip it over and fill the other side too.

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Now we need to file a small groove in the side of the catch. This give the catch spring somewhere to sit, while will be needed when we up the tension on it.

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Doesn’t need to be very deep, talking only 0.5-1mm here.

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Time to start on the reassembly.

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Put the plunger back in the tube.

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Then the end cap.

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Twist the plunger and end cap so that the slot is located at the top.

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Reinforcement time! Remove the screw holding in the catch spring, and the spring itself.

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Then reinforce the catch and spring mount with epoxy. Get as much as you can around the two mounts without interfering with the movement of the catch, the spring or the plunger rod. Place the other components in from time to time to test that it all still functions.

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Then reinforce in-front and behind the plunger tube mounts on both halves of the shell.

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Also put a fair amount of hot glue above and below the mounts too.

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Replace the catch spring. Specifically with the arm pointing straight down as pictured.

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Put the screw back in, then the catch. To put the catch back in you’ll have to use a screwdriver to force it across as you drop the catch down. Since we’ve moved the other arm around further and pre-tensioned the spring putting this in can be kinda difficult. It will happen though!

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See that nice new slot we carved out before? The spring should rest in that.

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Grab your Dremel again and grind away the two pointy tabs where the base of the stock used to sit in the handle. They’re pointy and will stick into your hand otherwise.

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Slot the plunger back into place. (I was also half way through gluing a few chunks of foam throughout the blaster at this stage, ignore that for the moment)

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Prop the priming handle back in place.

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Which makes putting the priming bar back in *way* easier.

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Slot the priming bar spring back in.

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Put the other half of the shell back on screwing it into place.

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Remember which screw went here? (it was the really small one)

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Screw the other half of the priming handle together.

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Tada! One couplered triple shot. For the barrel you can now use pretty well whatever you want, provided it fits inside 15mm PCV. Simply cut a small section of 15mm PVC and nest your chosen barrel material. I tested an assortment as shown below. No results as of yet as I’ll be continuing this post next week…

No, next week we’ll be building RSBC 🙂

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2 thoughts on “Mod Shop – Lanard Triple Shot – Spring upgrade, deadspace reduction, couplered, shell reinforcement.

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